Seacombe Island Is Here!

cover of Seacombe Island

It’s here! My novel Seacombe Island has been published and is for sale on Amazon!

I began the novel as a 2011 NaNoWriMo manuscript. Since then, I’ve rewritten and edited most of the chapters several times and added a few characters that the zero draft didn’t include. Somewhere along the way I had put it aside while I finished graduate school, but the amount of work wasn’t ever really the issue. The big problem was that I had trouble developing the main character, Thomas Ashton. I had supporting characters who knew who they were right from the start, but not my protagonist. He was playing his cards close to his chest and refused to confide in me.

And so I put the manuscript aside and let the problem stew for awhile. Eventually I began sorting out some of the themes and gaining a better sense of what the driving forces were behind my characters. As I went through and edited some of the bits that were really irritating me the protagonist’s personality became clearer, and the more I delved into his backstory, the better I understood him.

What really helped me sort out some of the backstory was writing a short story based on the Seacombe Island world, “Hekatite,” which was published in the Smoke and Steam anthology this spring. Even though Tom isn’t in the short story, Edward Grey and Tom’s friend, Samuel Grey, are. Writing about them and figuring out what they were up to, and how it would affect Tom in the future, gave me a guideline and was a lot of fun.

I hope you enjoy Seacombe Island!

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Smoke and Steam Free Ebook

We’re running a promotion for our second anthology, Smoke and Steam. Beginning at midnight, Pacific Daylight Time, you can get a copy of the ebook from Amazon for free. The promotion runs through March 19 and ends at 11:59 PDT.

Smoke and Steam contains four Steampunk novellas from Corrugated Sky‘s authors. For those of you unfamiliar with the term, the Steampunk genre is a type of science fiction/fantasy/alternative history based on Victorian-era technology. Sometimes it includes magic, or werewolves, or man/machine hybrids. And airships and trains are pretty much de rigueur.

The adventures in Smoke and Steam include “Wings over Staria,” by JC Rock;
“Hekatite,” by Karen Garvin; “Heart of the Matter,” by Michelle Schad; and “Freedom for a Foster,” by Cathryn Leigh.

Head on over to Amazon during the promotion and download a free copy of the ebook. While you’re there, why not pick up a paperback, too? After all, it’s how the Victorians would have read their books!

Running through the Year

My first attempt at acrylic painting. In case it’s not obvious, the red things are pears. And don’t ask why one of them is standing up!

I’m trying to get back into running. No, scratch that. I am getting back into running. I signed up for a 10K virtual race this time. No 5K — just straight into a 10K. Well, I haven’t been running, and the race is scheduled to be live in just three weeks, so I don’t have much time to train. That means, of course, that I’m going to be doing a lot more walking than I am running. The biggest issue is going to be just dealing with the time, because music, audiobooks, or story line for the race aside, the treadmill gets boring very quickly. But I have a list a mile long of why I won’t run in the neighborhood, and why I don’t want to drive to a park to do my running. So, treadmill it is.

The race is the Run to the Deep and I already have the tank top in hand (because who can resist a kraken?), but I won’t wear it until the official race. That’s going to be my reward for training and seeing the race through. After the race I’ll likely drop back and do some additional foundation work, aiming to keep building muscle and adding in some sprints to get my speed up. I’ve only been training about two and a half weeks, but I can feel a difference in my legs already.

In writing news, we’ve begun working on stories for our third Corrugated Sky anthology, which we hope to release in September. I can tell you that the theme is zombies, but you’ll have to buy the book to read the stories. I’ll keep posting updates as the projects progress. Meanwhile, I’m finishing up the cover art for Seacombe Island and doing a final read-through to catch any typos or other issues. The novel should be ready for release in early March and I’ll keep you up-to-date on its progress. We also have some other novels in the works, and a writer’s journal series that is currently under development. In all, we are hoping to release five new titles this year, so it’s going to be a busy spring and summer!

Thursday Writing Prompt No. 142

F is for Febrrrr..uary

It’s been some time since I’ve written a Thursday Writing Prompt, and since it’s Valentine’s Day next week, a romantic theme might be just right for this week’s exercise. So without further ado, let’s get down to business at the keyboard (or pen and paper).

Your task for this week is to come up with your characters for romance story. Give them both names, and then write a brief resume of that person’s life: their background (siblings, where they grew up); their current job (or lack of one — maybe they’re in school yet); their likes and dislikes (food, drinks, sports, hobbies, pets); and most important, how they view their life. This doesn’t have to be a long paragraph or pages of writing. In fact, writing a bullet-point list might be a better option.

With the list format you can make up a batch of characters for use in whatever stories you want. While I was drafting Seacombe I came across some websites that offered enneagram tests. In case you haven’t heard of an enneagram, it’s a type of personality test. In any case, I found it useful for figuring out some of my characters’ personality profiles. You might find that using an enneagram test or some other personality test will help you sort out what it is that drives your characters. Once you know who they are and what they want, stories are much easier to write. Good luck with your character lists!